Professional Lawn, Shrub & Tree Care
9418 Corsair Road, Frankfort, IL
(815) 469-5566 | (630) 620-5050 | (219) 836-8075
Mon-Fri: 9-5 | Sat: 7-1

Lawn FAQ

As lawn, tree and shrub experts, we’re dedicated to providing you with the best products, services and information. Below are some of the most common questions regarding lawns followed by a detailed answer. If you have a question for us that is not listed below please feel free to contact us.

Q: I can fertilize my own lawn, so why do I need a lawn care company?

A: While it is true that anyone can apply fertilizer to their own lawn, there are many things that homeowners are unaware of when it comes to all that is involved in the proper care of turfgrass. Such things as how much fertilizer should be applied, at what times during the year should they be applied, what rate should these products be applied at, what weed controls work best for which weeds, what is the difference between insect damage and a disease lesions, etc. The list goes on, and some answers can change depending on what type of weather we are encountering during any particular summer. Unfortunately, some people discover this only after they have incurred costly damage to their lawn. Most people find that the cost of having professionals handle their lawn care needs is only slightly higher than the actual cost of purchasing and applying their own products. And it is definitely less expensive than the cost of repairing fertilizer or herbicide damage.

Q: What kind of service does your company provide?

A: At Eternally Green Lawn Care, we offer professional lawn care at affordable prices, without the hassle of annoying sales calls. Our lawn care program consists of a five-step fertilization program along with aerations, disease and insect control for those who desire these services. We use only the best products on the market today, coupled with an exceptional customer service philosophy. Results are guaranteed! Our technicians have years of experience in the lawn care field, and they continue to attend training seminars throughout the year to keep up with the ever-changing demands of the lawn care industry.

Q: How many fertilizer applications do I need for my lawn?

A: There is a fine line between too much and too little fertilizer, but the recommended number of applications is generally 4 or 5 for any given year. Due to the various diseases that are out there, proper fertilization can either help or harm your grass. That is why knowing when, what and how much to apply is important. Excessive fertilizer applications and/or applying the wrong type of fertilizer at the wrong time can actually cause problems to develop within your lawn.

Q: What is the proper way to mow my lawn?

A: Mowing is one of the most crucial practices done to a homeowner’s lawn, but also the one that is most often done incorrectly. Mowing height is critical to your lawns survival especially during the hot summer months. Most lawns are a combination of bluegrass and fescues, and they should be cut high. Grass blade height should be between 2 ½ to 3 ¼ inches high after mowing (except for lawns consisting of Bentgrass, then the height is different). The blade height of grass above ground is in direct proportion to root depth below ground. This means taller grass, deeper and healthier roots, short grass, shallow roots and potential for root death. Avoid leaving excess clippings. Too many clippings can lead to thatch problems down the road. Remember the 1/3rd rule—don’t cut more than a third of the grass blade off at one time. This will cause undue stress that can lead to serious problems, such as thinning, disease, etc. Finally, make sure your blade is sharp. Dull blades will tear grass instead of cutting it cleanly. This will cause grass tips to yellow, giving your entire lawn a yellowish look.

Q: What is the proper way to water my lawn?

A: Another important practice that if done incorrectly can lead to problems. Amount, frequency and timing are all important factors that need to be considered when watering your lawn. A lawn should receive between 1-1 ½ inches of water per week (extreme conditions may call for more). This can be measured with a rain gauge or simple coffee can. Length of watering time should be consistent and should adequately supply ½ to ¾ inch of water during any single watering. Watering for short periods of time can lead to shallow-rooted grass that can stress out during the hot summer months. Timing is also crucial. Avoid nighttime watering as it can make grass susceptible to disease pathogens. Those without sprinkler systems and who work all week often face the dilemma of either watering at night when you return home or not watering at all. Try this method instead; it has helped many people caught in this predicament. Set your hose out in the area(s) you want to water the night before. In the morning when you are getting ready for work, turn the sprinklers on and let them run until you are ready to leave. As you leave for work, shut the sprinklers off. That night, move the sprinkler to the next area(s) and repeat this process the following morning. Your lawn will receive the necessary water it needs and you will avoid making conditions more susceptible to disease.

Q: What are lawn diseases?

A: A disease is caused by fungi that are found in a lawn’s soil. When these fungi are presented with optimal conditions, disease lesions will begin to appear within a lawn. There are many different fungi and many different outside factors that work together to bring about a disease. Diseases can develop due to unfavorable growing conditions, poor cultural practices, nutrient deficiencies or excesses, thick thatch layer, extremes in temperature, air humidity, and moisture, etc. This is only a small list of some of the causes. Some of these can be controlled, while others cannot. The best defense against diseases is to practice proper cultural practices (mowing, watering, etc.) and timely fertilization. Together these practices develop healthy turf that can withstand the assault from diseases.

Q: I regularly mow, water and fertilize my lawn while my neighbor does nothing. Yet every year I get grubworms and they do not, why?

A: Quite simply, your lawn is more appealing. White grubs are the larvae of beetles. These beetles need to lay their eggs in the soil in order for their eggs to hatch. When having to choose between burrowing through a hard, dry, compacted soil or a well cared for, healthy soil, the choice is obvious. Your lawn offers the least amount of work for them and is thus a more appealing environment for laying their eggs.

Q: How can I get rid of wild grasses in my lawn?

A: Depends on the grass. Crabgrass and other annuals can be prevented by applying the proper pre-emergent. A timely spring application will keep their seeds from germinating. However, if not prevented once they come up they are difficult to control. As for undesirable grasses, such as Tall Fescue, and Quackgrass, there are few, if any, effective controls. Since these grasses are not annuals, they remain from year to year, making them almost impossible to get rid of. Controlling them often involves damaging surrounding desirable grasses and the cost usually outweighs the results that are yielded. Since these wild grasses are everywhere, chances are they will return the following season as well.

Q: When is the best time to seed?

A: Either during the spring or early fall months. Seeding during the wet seasons will usually help ensure that the seed receives enough water to germinate. It is important to choose the correct seed when preparing to reseed an area. For example, shady bluegrass for shady areas or a sunny mixture for exposed areas.

Q: How long after you spray my weeds before they die?


A: Weed control begins working almost immediately, curling and browning the weeds. When this occurs the weeds are dying. However, it usually takes 10-14 days before dead weeds fully disappear from view. This is aided by mowing. (give it about 2-3 mowings) After that, if weeds are still present, or new weeds appear, call us and we will rectify the problem promptly.

 

Tree & Shrub FAQ

As lawn, tree and shrub experts, we’re dedicated to providing you with the best products, services and information. Below are some of the most common questions regarding lawns followed by a detailed answer. If you have a question for us that is not listed below please feel free to contact us.

Q: Why do I need to fertilize my trees and shrubs?

A: In nature, soils are rich with nutrients due to natural decomposition of leaf and twig materials that keep trees and plants healthy. In contrast, most landscapes surrounding homes are typically planted in soils low in organic matter and thus low in nutrients. Most nutrient-rich soils are typically removed during the construction process, leaving behind only nutrient deficient soil, primarily clay. Planting ornamentals in these poor soil conditions will usually result in stunted plant growth, poor appearance and in some cases death of the plant. Fertilizing gives these new plants the necessary nutrients they need to help them adapt to these conditions. While it is very beneficial to fertilize your ornamentals regularly, it is absolutely critical that newer plants are fertilized for the first five years after they are planted to ensure proper growth and a healthy lifespan.

Q: What kind of service does your company provide?

A: At Eternally Green Lawn Care, we offer professional tree and shrub care at affordable prices, without the hassle of annoying sales calls. Our tree and shrub care program consists of a two-step fertilization program along with disease and insect control for those plants that are at risk. We use only the best products on the market today, coupled with an exceptional customer service philosophy. Results are guaranteed! We also offer pruning to help shape and maintain the health of your ornamentals. Our technicians have years of experience in the tree and shrub field, and they continue to attend training seminars throughout the year to keep up with the ever-changing demands of the tree and shrub care industry.

Q: How many treatments do I need for my trees and shrubs?

A: Knowing when, what and how much to apply is important. Excessive fertilizer applications and/or applying the wrong type of fertilizer at the wrong time can actually cause problems or waste your money. We suggest the two-step fertilization program, with one fertilization in the spring and the other fertilization in late summer or early fall. Insect treatments are available under 2 different formats—preventative and at-need. The preventative method is a one-time application designed to prevent insects from gaining a foothold in your trees and shrubs. The cost is more but it does offer you piece of mind. The at-need method is designed to treat only those plants that show signs of insect activity. Whereas this method is initially less costly, the bonus does fall on the homeowner to be more observant with their landscape and to notify us if problems arise so we can treat as needed. Fungicide treatments are also applied as preventatives or at-need depending on the plant type.

Q: What are tree and shrub diseases?

A: Most diseases are caused by fungi that are opportunistic pathogens, which are ever present awaiting the opportune time. When these fungi are presented with optimal conditions, disease lesions will begin to appear on a plant. There are many different fungi and many different outside factors that work together to bring about a disease. Diseases can develop due to unfavorable growing conditions, poor cultural practices, nutrient deficiencies, plant species, extremes in temperature, air humidity, and moisture, etc. This is only a small list of some of the causes. Prevention and timely treatments greatly assist in keeping disease damage from destroying your valuable plants.

Q: What is the proper way to water my trees and shrubs?

A: While watering is important, the truth is that most homeowners over-water their ornamentals. This leads to a condition known as root rot—when a plant receives too much water and begins to rot away at the root structure. Please understand that watering depends on several factors: type of plant, location of plant, weather conditions, soil conditions and area drainage. Our technicians can advise you on what practices would be best for your specific needs.

Q: Are these fertilizer treatments harmful to my surrounding flowerbeds?

A: No, these fertilizer treatments will not adversely affect your annuals and perennials. Fertilizer consists of Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potassium. Each of these nutrients provides specific benefits to all plants. Nitrogen—stimulates production of chlorophyll, which results in the dark leaf color and also boosts the growth of shoots, leaves and roots. Phosphorous—aids in rooting and overall growth. Potassium—increases a plants vigor and stress resistance, which helps it withstand adverse weather, as well as insect and disease damage. Fertilizers can be applied in several ways, all of which pose no threat of damage to your flowers. Deep root fertilizing is done by injecting a probe deep into the soil and delivering fertilizer down to the plants root structures. Other methods such as drenching and/or dry fertilizer pellets applied to the mulch beds, effectively deliver the fertilizer to plants and shrubs as well.

Q: Why are insects a concern for some of my plants but not others?

A: Quite simply, some trees and shrubs are just more susceptible to insect invasion than others. Due to their make-up and accessibility to specific invading insect, some trees and shrubs make inviting targets. To the untrained eye many of these early symptoms can go unnoticed. Our technicians are trained to correctly identify which plants are at risk and then treat these problems before they become serious. Once the insect type is determined, the correct method of control must be administered (example: contact or systemic pesticide).

Q: Why should I prune my trees and shrubs?

A: There are many benefits to pruning your trees and shrubs:

  1. The aesthetic benefits.
  2. Healthier and more vigorous plant growth.
  3. Allows more air and light in, which aids the plant as well as any turfgrasses surrounding the plant.
  4. Maintains or reduces the size of the plant which prevents it from outgrowing its location.
  5. Removes dead, diseased and/or broken branches, which assists in the plants growth, overall health and reduces potential hazards to people.
  6. Returns the plant to its more natural growth pattern by removing water sprouts, suckers and weak branches, thus making the plant stronger.

Q: When and how should I prune my trees and shrubs?

A: Again it depends on the types of trees or shrubs you have. Some should be pruned in the spring, others in the fall, and some can be pruned at any time of the year. Knowing the proper time to prune can mean the difference between having healthy plants and causing costly damage to your valuable landscape. Also, knowing what to prune is as vitally important as knowing when. Removing the wrong branches, or incorrectly removing branches and limbs can cause serious damage to your plants by opening them up to insect invasion. Damage can be evident for years to come and in severe cases can lead to the death of the plant.

Q: What can you do for my Crab Apple trees?

A: Crab Apples are some of the most beautiful trees but are also some of the most sensitive and susceptible to disease, primarily Apple Scab Disease. This disease causes unsightly lesions to form on leaves and can result in early defoliation of the tree. This disease is very prevalent during wet springs. Due to the susceptibility of these plants to disease, prevention is crucial in maintaining a healthy plant. We recommend a 3-step fungicide program, along with regular pruning to maintain the health of these trees. Our technicians can further discuss this type of program with you.

 

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